A web page for keeping up to date with current plant research in Ireland relevant to the conservation of the Irish Flora


vert bar Each entry comprises a project with the following information:
  • Title of Research
  • Researcher(s) and Institution(s)
  • Institution of Principal Researcher
  • Research Level (Undergraduate, Msc, PhD, Institutional etc.)
  • Summary (100 words max)
  • Funding Agency or Source
  • Duration (end date)
  • Relevant Vice Counties or geographical area covered.
  • Keywords (6 maximum) SEARCH HERE ...
  • Taxa covered
  • Associated Habitats
  • Skills, techniques or expertise developed, or being developed, for this work.
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  • Links or relevant webpages
Help us to compile a complete and up-to-date index to conservation related research on the Irish flora, by submitting information on your research using the downloadable submission form (left). There are only 14 fields to complete and the process should take you no more than 5 minutes.

Last update on: March 4, 2010
Title Control of Aquatic Invasive Species and Restoration of Natural Communities in Ireland (CAISIE)
Lead Researcher Joe Caffrey (Central Fisheries Board)
Institution Central Fisheries Board
Research Level Institutional
Summary CAISIE is an EU Life+ funded programme which will contribute to the understanding and control of aquatic invasive species in Ireland.
The broad objective of the project is to contribute to the halting of biodiversity loss in Ireland by preventing further impacts on native biodiversity from high impact aquatic invasive species. This will be achieved through the development and demonstration of effective control methods, a programme of stakeholder engagement and awareness raising, the enactment of appropriate robust legislation, and policy development and dissemination. The specific objectives of the project include:-
  • To protect the native biodiversity in Lough Corrib by eradicating, controlling or containing Lagarosiphon major.
  • To prevent further spread of high impact aquatic invasive species by implementing control measures in a key dispersal corridor (i.e. the canals and Barrow Navigation).
  • To conduct a detailed desk study and consult experts and authorities widely in order to collect data on the ecology and invasive capacities of the more problematic alien species and on effective control methods. This information will permit the development of informed guidelines for effective aquatic invasive species management.
  • To implement the widest range of containment, control and eradication procedures as is available in an effort to eliminate alien species from the targeted waters. The success of these methods will be scientifically monitored and the results will be used to inform ongoing control proposals. Specific research focus will be placed on developing new and innovative containment and control methods for use against the range of invasive species present in Irish waters.
  • To engage key stakeholders in an education and awareness programme aimed at preventing new invasions, further spread and reinvasion by existing high impact species.
  • To exchange and disseminate information on control and management methods with other European invasive species control teams and policy makers leading to more effective control of aquatic invasives in Ireland and across Europe.
  • To contribute to the protection of biodiversity in Ireland and the European target to halt biodiversity loss by 2010 by building capacity on invasive species control.
Funding Agency EU Life+ funded
Duration September 2009 – March 2013
Relevant Vice Counties Galway, Mayo, Dublin, Carlow, Wexford
Keywords Invasive Aliens, Restoration
Taxa covered: Lagarosiphon major, Elodea nuttallii, Crassula helmsii, Azolla filiculoides, Fallopia japonica, Heracleum mantegazzianum, Impatiens glandulifera, Gunnera tinctoria
Habitats Lakes, Rivers, Canals
Expertise Control of Invasive Aliens and Restoration Ecology
Contact details Joe Caffrey (Central Fisheries Board)
info@caisie.ie
Links CAISIE website

Lagarosiphon web page



Last update on: March 4, 2010
Title Eradication of Carpobrotus edulis on Howth Head and restoration of cliff habitats
Researchers Noeleen Smyth, Cristina Armstrong and Matthew Jebb (National Botanic Gardens) Deborah Tiernan (Fingal County Council)
Institution National Botanic Gardens
Research Level Institutional
Summary At present Carpobrotus is not regarded as a serious pest in Ireland, but it has become economically unviable to control it in SW England, and the Channel Islands, where it has become dominant on extensive areas of coastline. With time it totally engulfs cliff-face communities, forming a mono-specific stand of hundreds of square meters in extent.
The first record for Carpobrotus edulis in the wild in Ireland is from Howth head with an Atlas record for 1962 (Reynolds 2002). A further 11 or so records occur in Ireland in counties Cork, Waterford, Wexford, Wicklow and Down. None of these latter colonies is large, comprising single patches each of which could be removed. The largest colonies known are those on Howth Head. A cliff-top survey of the south side of Howth was conducted on the March 25, 2009, for alien invasive plants from Shielmartin Road to the Baily Lighthouse. Six colonies of Carpobrotus on the south side of Howth head have been located.
Other aliens of concern noticed on the pathway are extensive colonies of Hebe and Berberis from the Needles to Lion’s Head. A single patch of Gaultheria was noticed above the Worn Hole. Libertia grandiflora is becoming a pest immediately east of Lion’s Head.
Various control methods will be trialed to ensure the safe and permanent removal of the plant from the cliffs. Restoration of cliff habitats will also be undertaken on an experimental level. Carpobrotus is a species still in the lag phase of invasiveness, which could be successfully prevented from permanent establishment in Ireland.
Funding Agency Heritage Council
Duration March 2010 – March 2011
Relevant Vice Counties Dublin
Keywords Invasive Aliens, Restoration, GSPC
Taxa covered: Carpobrotus edulis
Habitats Sea Cliffs
Expertise Control of Invasive Aliens and Restoration Ecology
Contact details
Links Carpobrotus web page

Alien Invasives (National Strategy for Plant Conservation) web page

Invasive Species Ireland webpage



Last update on: March 4, 2010
Title Biogeography of Irish Arctic-Alpine Caryophyllaceae
Researcher Emma Howard-Williams (NUI Maynooth), Conor Meade (NUI Maynooth), Colin Kelleher and Matthew Jebb (National Botanic Gardens)
Institution National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Research Level PhD
Summary The Irish arctic-alpine flora consists of a rare and fragmented group of plants, some of which have disjunct populations distributed around Europe. According to conventional theory of plant immigration to Ireland, species colonized the island at the end of the Pleistocene glaciation via a landbridge across the Irish Sea from Britain. Some Irish plant species however do not exist in Britain and in the case of the red data species Arenaria ciliata and Minuartia recurva, these have their closest neighbour populations respectively in the Jura Mountains and in Portugal (Webb, 1983).
The project has three major aims
  • To determine postglacial migration routes in Ireland for the species A. ciliata and M. recurva which will be tested using a comparative phylogeographical analysis including a range of Caryophyllaceae (Arenaria norvegica, Silene acaulis, Minuartia verna, M. rubella, M. sedoides and Arenaria serpyllifolia).
  • To ascertain (i) the genotype of each individual using AFLP and cpDNA markers, and (ii) the genetic diversity of each population.
  • To complete an accurate distribution record of the two Irish red data target species and establish the genetic vitality and viability of the individual Irish populations, compared to their European counterparts. Seed material will be collected from the wild populations and cultivated in the Botanic Gardens.
Funding Agency Science Foundation Ireland
Duration September 2009 - October 2012
Relevant Vice Counties Waterford, Kerry, Clare, Donegal, Mayo
Keywords Arctic-Alpines, Caryophyllaceae
Taxa covered: Arenaria ciliate, Minuartia recurva,
Habitats Montane
Expertise
Contact details
Links See Research Page



Last update on: March 1, 2010
Title Montane heath and bryophyte plant communities of the western Irish mountains and their potential response to climate change
Researcher Rory Hodd and Micheline Sheehy Skeffington
Institution National University of Ireland, Galway
Research Level PhD
Summary The montane heath vegetation of the western Irish mountains is strongly influenced by the highly oceanic climate prevalent in the region. In particular, many montane species of bryophyte, especially those of the mixed northern hepatic mat, are dependant on the humid, equable conditions provided by the oceanic conditions of western Ireland. However, with projected climate change, many of these communities and species may come under threat. This project is concerned with describing this vegetation, establishing the influence of climate on its composition and distribution and predicting what impact projected changes in climate may have on montane heath vegetation.
Funding Agency NPWS, IRCSET
Duration September 2007 - October 2010
Relevant Vice Counties Kerry, Donegal, Mayo (Galway)
Keywords Montane heath, hepatics, oceanic, climate
Taxa covered: All
Habitats Montane heathland
Expertise
Contact details rlhodd@gmail.com
Links



Last update on: January 19, 2010
Title Investigating gene diversity in temperature-related genes in Aspen
Researcher Colin Kelleher (National Botanic Gardens)
Annelies Pletsers (Trinity College Dublin)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Ph.D.
Summary The National Botanic Gardens of Ireland is collaborating with the Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Sweden on a phenology research project. Annelies Pletsers of Trinity College is undertaking a PhD research project entitled ‘Climate change impacts on phenology: implications for terrestrial ecosystems’. Part of the project involves assessing genetic variation in natural populations of Aspen (Populus tremula). Aspen has a wide longitudinal and latitudinal range. It shows variation in bud burst across this range, and we aim to identify genetic variation in this range also. We are identifying candidate genes and assessing for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes.
Funding Agency
Duration 2009-2012
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland and Europe
Keywords Phenology, Genetics, SNPs
Taxa covered: Populus tremula
Habitats
Expertise SNPs, Genetic analysis
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:colin.kelleher at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040326
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/aspen.htm

Phenology Research Group, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin



Last update on: September 3, 2009
Title Epiphyte diversity in plantation and native forests
Researcher Howard Fox & Daniel Kelly
Institution Botany Department, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
Research Level Ph.D.
Summary Mosses, liverworts and lichens are the principal groups of epiphytes in Irish forests. We sampled Sitka spruce reforestation plantations at four stages of the forest cycle – 1 prethicket, 2 thicket, 3 mid-rotation and 4 mature. We also looked at two types of old native woods namely Oak-dominated oakbirch- holly (WN1) woods and Ash-dominated oak-ash-hazel woods (WN2). Species richness (SR) figures were derived by combining species lists from 15 plots (3 quadrats each at 5 sites) covering a total area of 1,500 m2 in each of the six forest types. Native woods differ from Sitka spruce plantations in the presence of a shrub layer, more complex patterns of rainfall through-flow and stem-flow, natural tree canopy gap dynamics rather than clear-fell, and moderate light levels. Sitka spruce plantations have the benefit of producing merchantable timber. It is postulated that most epiphytes on Sitka spruce have come from heather moorland. Hypnum jutlandicum, Kindbergia praelonga, Colura calyptrifolia, Metzgeria temperata, Byssoloma subdiscordans, Dimerella lutea, Dimerella pineti, Fellhanera bouteillei, Gyalideopsis anastomosans, Porina leptalea, Lophium mytilinum and Sarea resinae are ecologically informative species.
Funding Agency
Duration 2007-2010
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Epiphytic Bryophytes, Epiphytic Lichens, Species richness, Woodland
Taxa covered: Bryophytes and Lichens
Habitats Woodland
Expertise
Contact details Botany Department, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
hfox@tcd.ie
Links



Last update on: August 18, 2009
Title A vegetation information system for grassland habitats in Ireland
Researcher David Bourke, S. Nolan, T. Hochstrasser and R. Schulte
Institution Johnstown Castle and University College Dublin
Research Level Institutional
Summary Grassland habitats comprise 70% of land cover in Ireland, and host a large proportion of Irish biodiversity. However, there is little national data on the spatial distribution of different grassland types (from intensive to species-rich). The conservation of farmland biodiversity and high nature value areas is an explicit objective of the Habitats Directive and EU Rural Development Policy, as is the prevention of species loss by 2010. The use of historical biological data is becoming more and more widespread as the value of long-term studies is being recognised in biological and environmental sciences. However, over time, information loss from biological datasets can be considerable and the quality and detail of metadata associated with historical datasets will determine to what extent historical datasets can be interpreted. The current knowledge on grassland vegetation is mostly based on a survey by Austin O'Sullivan of Irish grasslands in the 1960's and 1970's. These data provide information on the floral composition of species-rich grasslands and provide a baseline for studies of change in such grassland area over time.

Objectives

  1. To safeguard this grassland dataset that is currently held in hard copy only by entering the information into an electronic vegetation database.
  2. To include a description of associated metadata, including materials and methods used in the collection of the data, and explanations of the data including definitions and personal comments made by O'Sullivan during this project.
  3. Disseminate this large ecological datasets to potential users of the data; policy makers, policy evaluators and researchers.
Related Publications

Bourke, D. and Hochstrasser. T. (2006). Digitisation of grassland heritage data. Final Report. The Heritage Council.

Funding Agency Teagasc
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Agricultural Ecology, Grassland
Taxa covered: All
Habitats Grassland
Expertise
Contact details david.bourke@teagasc.ie +353-53-9171273
Links



Last update on: August 18, 2009
Title Identifying High Nature Value farmland in the west of Ireland
Researcher Caroline Sullivan, M. Gormally, M. Sheehy Skeffington, J.A. Finn and S. Kelly.
Institution Johnstown Castle and University College Galway
Research Level Institutional
Summary Identification of High Nature Value (HNV) farmland is an emerging policy issue. Within EU DG Agriculture, the conservation of High Nature Value areas is an explicit objective, with support available for the conservation of high nature value farmed environments which are under threat'. A major effort is needed to fill the data gaps on the distribution and character of HNV areas, and the targeting and effectiveness of support measures. Three types of HNV farmland are currently recognised:
Type 1: Farmland with a high proportion of semi-natural vegetation,
Type 2: Farmland dominated by low intensity agriculture or with a mosaic of semi-natural and cultivated land and small scale features such as hedgerows, ponds or scrub patches
Type 3: Farmland supporting rare species or a high proportion of European or world populations.

Objectives

  1. Identify the criteria that must be met for a farm to be considered HNV.
  2. Develop farm-scale survey methods to identify HNV farmland.
  3. Test the application of these criteria on a national level using remote sensing techniques.

The study focuses on east Co. Galway where eight District Electoral Divisons (DEDs were selected using random stratified sampling.

Habitat maps were created for each farm surveyed. Grassland habitats were the most common, but a total of 26 different habitat types were identified across the 11 farms surveyed, with 12 habitats common to both DEDs including improved grassland, wet grassland and scrub. Each DED also had several habitats unique to it (as far as was sampled). The number of habitats per farm surveyed ranged from 13 to 4, the lower numbers often due to the use of wire fencing instead of hedgerows or stone walls; 90% of farms had six or more habitats. The average number of habitats per farm was 8.
Sampling so far has recorded no true species-rich grasslands. However using Ellenberg Values for nitrogen and moisture, and comparing these with the species-richness of each field, there is evidence for semi-improved fields. These are less intensively managed and may facilitate an increase in plant species richness more than in improved fields. The proportion of semi-improved fields on a farm could be a significant indicator of its HNV status.

Related Publications

Sullivan, C.. Sheehy Skeffington, M., Finn, J., Gormally, M and Kelly, S. (2006). Identification of species-rich grassland as key elements of High Nature Value (HNV) farmlands in the west of Ireland. Irish Plant Scientists' Association Meeting (IPSAM), MA, Galway, 10-12's April, 2006, p. 17

Sullivan, C., Sheehy Skeffington, M., Gormally, M ., Finn, J.A. and Kelly, S. (2007). Identifying High Nature Value Grassland in the West of Ireland. High Value Grassland: providing biodiversity. a clean environment and premium products, Proceedings of conference, University of Keele, Staffordshire, 17-19 April 2007.

Funding Agency Teagasc
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties Galway
Keywords Agricultural Ecology, HNV farmland
Taxa covered: All
Habitats Grassland
Expertise
Contact details caroline.sullivan at gmail.com Tel.: +353-91-492683
Links



Last update on: August 18, 2009
Title Species-rich field margins in grass-based farming systems
Researcher Rochelle Fritch, H. Sheridan, J. Feehan, D. hUallacháin (Johnstown Castle), D. Madden (Johnstown Castle) and J.A. Finn (Johnstown Castle)
Institution University College Dublin and Johnstown Castle
Research Level Institutional
Summary Many floral or faunal species would have restricted ranges or be absent altogether from intensively farmed land were it not for field margin habitats and other non-crop areas. The ecological importance of field margins has been recognised through Measures 5, 6 and 9 of the Rural Environmental Protection Scheme. However, work by Feehan et al. (2005) suggests that current REPS measures have not had significant benefits for the flora or invertebrate fauna of these habitats. Grassland management practices are often perceived to be less damaging to plant and invertebrate populations than those associated with tillage systems. However, available research indicates otherwise. Narrow field margins have a high edge-to-area ratio and therefore are vulnerable to the farming practices being carried out in the surrounding area (such as accidental spreading of fertiliser and slurry).
The loss of botanical and structural diversity and the management practices associated with sward 'improvement may have profoundly negative effects on arthropod populations.
  1. To investigate the effect of time on biodiversity within established field margin plots.
  2. To investigate potential new measures and management options to enhance diversity of plants and invertebrates.
Firstly, a monitoring programme within established field margin plots will be completed. Treatments are as follows:
  1. fenced: existing grass sward is fenced off from surrounding paddock,
  2. rotavated and fenced: rotavated and allowed to regenerate naturally,
  3. rotavated and reseeded: rotavated and reseeded with a grass and wild flower seed mixture.
These three treatments are established across a range of margin widths.
In additional work, new field margin plots will be established at Johnstown Castle. Two types of field margin plots will be investigated: comer and linear plots. Three seed mixtures, within these plots, will be planted with: a simple grass mixture, a simple grass and herb mixture, and a complex mixture of grasses and herbs. Three grazing regimes will be implemented: ungrazed, grazed for a short period within the year and grazed with the rest of the paddock. Floral and invertebrate diversity will be investigated within these experimental plots. The abundance and percentage cover of plant species will be recorded and invertebrate diversity measured by emergence and pitfall trapping. A similar pilot project will be implemented on a number of commercial farms.

Related Publications:
Feehan, J., GlIlmor, A. and Culleton. N. (2005) Effects of an agri-environmental scheme on Farmland biodiversity in Ireland Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 107: 275-286.

Sheridan, H., Finn, J.A., Culleton, N., O'Donovan, G. 2007. Plant and invertebrate diversity In grassland field margins. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment (in press).

Funding Agency Teagasc
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Agricultural Ecology
Taxa covered: All
Habitats Grassland
Expertise
Contact details rochelle.fritch@teagasc.ie Tel.: +353-53-9171264
Links



Last update on: August 18, 2009
Title Does plant diversity stabilise ecosystem function?
Researcher Tim Carnus, J.A. Finn (Johnstown Castle), L. Kirwan (Johnstown Castle) and J. Connolly (University College Dublin)
Institution University College Dublin and Johnstown Castle
Research Level Institutional
Summary Ecological theory predicts that more diverse ecosystems are more stable in the face of environmental change. Although biodiversity is well known to positively affect ecosystem functioning under stable conditions, less is known about such relationships under conditions of environmental fluctuation. The Insurance hypothesis proposes that diversity buffers ecosystems against change. Adapting recently developed experimental and modelling approaches, this study tests the Insurance hypothesis in mixed grassland systems by applying environmental perturbation treatments and measuring the productivity response. A second investigation of the Insurance hypothesis involves the resistance of a system to invasive species. This will be addressed by analysing community composition dynamics. The results are expected to give further evidence supporting the use of mixtures in managed grassland but also to provide some quantitative evaluation of a central ecological theory. Thus, we will test whether:
  • more diverse grassland mixtures maintain forage production across perturbation gradients
  • more diverse grassland mixtures are more resistant to invasive species
Funding Agency Teagasc
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Agricultural Ecology
Taxa covered: All
Habitats Grassland
Expertise
Contact details tim.carnus@teagasc.ie Tel: +353-53-9171288
Links



Last update on: August 18, 2009
Title Botanical re-survey of Clare Island
Researcher Matthew Jebb, Donal Synnott
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional
Summary In 1909 Robert Lloyd Praeger spearheaded a hugely ambitious biological survey of Clare island off the coast of county Mayo. This project was the first major biological survey of a specific area carried out in the world. Between 1909 and 1911 more than 100 scientists from across Europe worked on the island, recording and collecting information on the archaelogy, botany, zoology, geology, history and folklore of the island. Praeger himself undertook a survey of the plants and vegetation of the island. In 1991, the Royal Irish Academy launched a new survey to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the initial survey. Donal Synnott is editing the volume on Botany, as well as reporting on the Bryophyte Flora of the Island. Tim Ryle (Vegetation), Mark Seaward (Lichens) and Matthew Jebb (Vascular flora) are contributing to this volume.
Funding Agency
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties Mayo
Keywords Floristics, Clare Island, Praeger
Taxa covered: Vascular and Bryophyte
Habitats All
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email: matthew.jebb at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040329
Links www.ria.ie/projects/clare_island/index.html



Last update on: August 18, 2009
Title Floras of the Irish Isles
Researcher Matthew Jebb
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary Field work, and a literature survey of Irish island floras revealed a correlation between the log of the island’s area to the log of species richness. These island floras conformed to a regression line, which indicated that with every doubling in area, an Irish island’s floral diversity increases by ca. 3.4 %.
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Floristics, Islands, Biogeography
Taxa covered: Vascular flora
Habitats Islands
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email: matthew.jebb at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040329
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/islands.htm



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Improving the delivery of advice from conservation ecology to REPS
Researcher Matthew Jebb (National Botanic Gardens), John Finn (Teagasc, Johnstown Castle)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional
Summary A methodology has been developed to identify areas of high plant diversity in Ireland. Being able to classify farmland as being of High Nature Value, in an objective manner, will allow the distribution of subsidies aimed at environmental protection to be targeted at the most appropriate farms. A preliminary survey has been undertaken for three counties as examples, and an outline of the next steps required to develop a regional or county scale operational model are being developed. The process identifies tetrads (2km by 2 km squares) of the Irish grid that contain specific plants or combinations of plants that indicate the presence of threatened and legally protected plants, as well as indicators of specific vegetation types. Publicising the areas thus identified data will allow any landowner to discover the areas on Ordnance Survey Landranger maps and discover if their land is eligible under the scheme. Any landowner has the possibility of opting into the scheme, even if their farm currently falls outside these areas, by identifying the presence of species or habitats on their land. Thus the scheme will neither be exclusive nor prescriptive, but will place a positive emphasis on biodiversity surveys of farmland. Historic occurrences indicating that the species was once present in a tetrad, and that management practices could allow its return, would provide a further incentive for farmers to adopt management practices that restore such habitats. These areas will not be legal site designations but provide a framework for identifying and highlighting the very best sites for plants and vegetation, which can then be used to support national or regional conservation actions and initiatives. (They will also highlight areas to local planning departments where Environmental Assessments may be important in planning decisions.)
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords REPS, Farmland Wildlife.
Taxa covered: All taxa
Habitats Farmland
Expertise Conservation of species and habitats
Contact details Matthew.jebb at opw.ie
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/reps.htm



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Current distribution of Cordgrass (Spartina anglica) in Northern Ireland
Researcher Dr Jane Preston, Gillian Robb, Tommy McDermott, Dr. Neil Reid
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level Institutional
Summary In accordance with the objectives of the Northern Ireland Spartina Control Group, this project aimed to further assess the current distribution of cord-grass at a number of priority sites throughout Northern Ireland and produce baseline maps to aid future management strategies.
Funding Agency Northern Ireland Environment Agency
Duration 2 years 2007 – 2009
Relevant Vice Counties Northern Ireland
Keywords Salt Marsh, Invasive species, Spartina
Taxa covered: Spartina anglica
Habitats Coastal
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/12InvasiveCordgrassdistribution/



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Efficacy of sod removal in regenerating fen vegetation
Researcher Dr Jane Preston, Tommy McDermott, Dr. Neil Reid
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level Institutional
Summary The main aim of this project was to test the efficacy of ‘sod removal’ as a fenland restoration technique using an experimental approach at Montiaghs Moss Nature Reserve from 2006 to 2008. The site suffered from rank purple moor-grass coverage which out-competed herbaceous species.
Funding Agency Northern Ireland Environment Agency
Duration 2 years 1/08/2006 – 31/10/2008
Relevant Vice Counties Antrim
Keywords Fen, Restoration, Vegetation
Taxa covered:
Habitats Fen
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/10Regeneratingfenvegetation/

Reid N., McEvoy P.M. & Preston J.S. (2009) Efficacy of sod removal in regenerating fen vegetation for the conservation of the marsh fritillary butterfly Euphydryas aurinia, Montiaghs Moss Nature Reserve, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Conservation Evidence, 6; 31-38.

Preston, J.S. & Reid, N. (2008) Efficacy of sod removal in regenerating fen vegetation. Report prepared by the Natural Heritage Research Partnership, Quercus for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Northern Ireland, UK.




Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Sustainability of grazing on sand dune systems
Researcher Lyndsey Herron, Prof. Christine Maggs, Dr. Neil Reid
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level PhD
Summary Establish the effect of livestock grazing on sand dune plant communities, particularly scrub. Differentiate the effects of grazing by livestock and wild rabbits on plant communities. Determine the potential affect of grazing on sand erosion and dune stability. Establish the degree to which grazers influence dune nutrient flow. Establish the distribution of invasive alien species including sea buckthorn on NI dunes. Evaluate the efficacy of agri-environment scheme measures in conserving dune quality
Funding Agency Natural Heritage Research Partnership (NHRP)
Duration 4 years 1/10/2008 – 30/09/2012
Relevant Vice Counties Northern Ireland
Keywords Grazing, Dunes,Invasive alien species
Taxa covered:
Habitats
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/6Grazingonsanddunes/



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Invasive Aquatic Plants in Northern Ireland
Researcher Ruth Kelly, Prof. Christine Maggs, Dr Chris Harrod, Dr. Neil Reid.
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level PhD
Summary Review and collate existing datasets on the distribution of invasive aquatic plants in NI.Review and collate existing datasets on the distribution of native aquatic plants of conservation concern in NI. Survey selected water bodies and river catchments (including designated SACs) for invasive alien species. Determine environmental parameters influencing invasion risk. Determine ecophysiological thresholds of specific invasive species of concern. Evaluate the putative impact of climate change on invasive species; their dispersal and ecological effects
Funding Agency Natural Heritage Research Partnership (NHRP)
Duration 3 years 1/10.2008 – 30/09/211
Relevant Vice Counties Northern Ireland
Keywords Invasive, Aquatic Plants
Taxa covered:
Habitats
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/5Invasiveaquaticplants/



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Distribution and genetic diversity of Ranunculus fluitans
Researcher Dr. Neil Reid, Dr Jane Preston, Dr Caroline Bradley, Dr Jim Provan
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level Institutional
Summary Determine the current distribution of Ranunculus fluitans on the Six Mile Water. Determine the levels and patterns of genetic variation in Ranunculus fluitans.Determine the degree to which Ranunculus species hybridise. Develop a rational and sustainable plan for the conservation of extant genetic diversity within the species
Funding Agency Natural Heritage Research Partnership (NHRP)
Duration 10 months 01/08/2008 – 30/06/2009
Relevant Vice Counties Vice County 39
Keywords Distribution, Genetic, Hybrisation, Conservation
Taxa covered: Ranunculus fluitans
Habitats Rivers
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/4WaterCrowfootgenetics/



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Genetic effects of woodland fragmentation: a case study of Alder Buckthorn (Frangula alnus)
Researcher Dr. Neil Reid, Dr Jane Preston, Dr Caroline Bradley, Dr Jim Provan
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level Institutional
Summary Determine the current distribution of Alder Buckthorn in Northern Ireland. Determine the levels and patterns of genetic diversity in Alder buckthorn in NI. Elucidate the relative roles of avichory and hydrochory in the establishment of Alder Buckthorn populations.
Funding Agency Natural Heritage Research Partnership (NHRP)
Duration 10 months: 01/08/2008 – 30/06/2009
Relevant Vice Counties Armagh, Vice county 37
Keywords Population genetics,Distribution, Conservation
Taxa covered: Frangula alnus
Habitats Wet woodland
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/3AlderBuckthorngenetics/



Last update on: July 20, 2009
Title Conservation of Juniper in Ireland
Researcher Dr. Neil Reid, Dr. Fiona Cooper, Prof Ian Montgomery (QUB), Deirdre Lynn (NPWS)
Institution Queens University Belfast
Research Level Institutional
Summary Establish the distribution and extent of Juniper formations. Determine the condition and future prospects of all Juniper formations. Assess the conservation status of the habitat. Propose management recommendations to ensure favourable conservation status is achieved. Propose a monitoring prescription for this habitat type.
Funding Agency National Parks and Wildlife Service
Duration 30 months: 01/04/2008 – 30/11/2010
Relevant Vice Counties Entire Irish range for the species
Keywords Conservation, Distribution, Habitat, Monitoring
Taxa covered: Juniperus
Habitats Chalk grassland, quarries, successional stages to woodland, limestone pavements and scars, acidophilous heath communities, exposed outcrops and exposed coastal environments.
Expertise
Contact details Dr. Neil Reid. neil.reid@qub.ac.uk
Links www.qub.ac.uk/sites/Quercus/Projects/2008/2ConservationofJuniper/



Last update on: May 13, 2009
Title Effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on plant diversity in Irish native woodland
Researcher Chloe Galley, Dept. of Botany, TCD. PI = Steve Waldren
Institution Dept. of Botany, TCD
Research Level Post-doctoral
Summary Increasing the amount of native woodland in Ireland is an important and active part of Ireland's conservation strategy. This project will look at the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on native plant biodiversity in native woodlands; findings will be used to provide guidelines on where to best place new woodlands or prioritise woodland expansion, so that the probability of high biodiversity is maximised. The importance of: regional landcover, the amount native woodland in the region, the configuration of existing woodlands, and site-specific aspects (e.g. age, woodland plot size, topological aspects) will be investigated. The National Survey of Native Woodland (from National Parks and Wildlife) forms the dataset.
Funding Agency IRCSET
Duration 2 years; end date is December 2010
Relevant Vice Counties Republic of Ireland
Keywords Biodiversity, native woodland, landscape ecology, fragmentation
Taxa covered: Lichens (uncertain), bryophytes and vascular plants
Habitats Native Woodland
Expertise Landscape ecology concepts, GIS, spatial statistics.
Contact details Chloe Galley, Centre for the Environment, Trinity College Dublin, galleyc@tcd.ie, 01 896 1121
Links



Last update on: May 13, 2009
Title Interactive flora of the Burren, Ireland
Researcher Heli Fitzgerald and Chloe Galley, Dept. of Botany, TCD. PI = John Parnell
Institution Dept. of Botany, TCD
Research Level ? no specific level
Summary An interactive flora of the dicotyledon plants of Co. Clare and south County Galway has been produced, covering native plants and established aliens. The flora comprises a description for each species, and a multi-access key. The species descriptions were written with the general public in mind and complicated botanical terms are avoided. For each species we aimed to show photographs of: plant habit, habitat, the flowers, leaves, fruits and any distinguishing features.The multi-access key allows the user to select which characteristics of the plant should be used for identification; this, and hotlinks between it and the species descriptions allow for rapid identification. A glossary explains any botanical terms used, with accompanying diagrams where needed.
Funding Agency EPA (through Biochange)
Duration 39753
Relevant Vice Counties County Clare and south County Galway
Keywords Flora, key, photography, Burren, Clare, Galway
Taxa covered: Dicots
Habitats all
Expertise Plant identification; plant photography; making plant descriptions and identification accessible to the general public.
Contact details Chloe Galley: Centre for the Environment, Trinity College Dublin, galleyc@tcd.ie, 01 896 1121
Links www.biochange.ie or contact above



Last update on: May 13, 2009
Title Assessing the Conservation Status of Turloughs
Researcher School of Natural Sciences and School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin.
Institution Principal investigators are based within the disciplines of Botany, Zoology, Geology and Environmental Engineering.
Research Level This project is comprised of four PhD projects and two postdoctoral sub-projects. One of the PhD projects is investigating the links between turlough vegetation diversity and ecohydrological and management factors.
Summary The turlough vegetation research project forms part of a large interdisciplinary project entitled Assessing the Conservation Status of Turloughs. Turloughs are annually flooding karstic depressions which constitute important groundwater-dependent ecosystems, identified as priority habitats under the EU Habitats Directive. The overall research project will integrate hydrological, hydrochemical and biological data from selected turloughs. The project aims to develop models relating turlough ecology to hydrology, and to formulate scientifically sound monitoring and conservation strategies.
Funding Agency NPWS, Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government and the EPA, Ireland.
Duration 40269
Relevant Vice Counties Counties Clare, Galway, Mayo and Roscommon.
Keywords Turloughs, ecohydrology, management, conservation, monitoring
Taxa covered: Grasses, sedges, rushes and herbaceous species.
Habitats Limestone pavement
Expertise Identification of wetland plant species. Vegetation description and classification using cluster analysis and ordination techniques. Integration of vegetation data with hydrological, management and substrate data using multivariate statistics. Vegetation community mapping using handheld mappers and GIS.
Contact details Sarah Kimberley kimberls@tcd.ie
Links www.tcd.ie/Botany/turlough_conservation



Last update on: May 13, 2009
Title Biodiversity of plants and molluscs in woodland, scrub and grassland habitats in a limestone landscape – effects of the removal of grazing.
Researcher Maria Long and Dr Daniel L Kelly
Botany Department
Trinity College Dublin
Institution Trinity College Dublin
Research Level PhD
Summary This project aims to investigate experimentally the impact of the removal of grazing on biodiversity in woodland, grassland and scrub in the Burren area. This is being done through a network of permanent plots and fenced exclosures. These have been erected at 12 sites and the study is monitoring responses among the communities of vascular plants and molluscs.
Funding Agency EPA
Duration Apr 2006 – Apr 2010
Relevant Vice Counties 9 and 15 (North Co. Clare, and South Co. Galway)
Keywords Mollusc, Burren, grazing, grassland, woodland, scrub
Taxa covered: Vascular plants, terrestrial molluscs (excluding slugs)
Habitats Calcareous grassland, hazel scrub, hazel/ash-hazel woodland, limestone pavement, vegetation pavement
Expertise Plant ID. Mollusc ID. Some GIS and statistical know-how.
Contact details marialongecol@yahoo.ie
Links



Last update on: May 13, 2009
Title Irish Flora
Researcher 1. John Parnell
2. Sarah Pene
3. Maximillian von Sternberg
4. Ursula King
5. Brendan Sayers
Institution TCD
Research Level Institutional
Summary 1.I am engaged and have just finished a revision of the Irish Flora
2.Irish, Scottish and American Eriocaulon
3. Daboecia in Ireland
4. Najas in Ireland and elsewhere
5. 5.
Funding Agency IRCSET & EPA
Duration 3 years
Relevant Vice Counties All
Keywords
Taxa covered: All Irish Taxa, Eriocaulon, Daboecia, Najas, Various Orchids
Habitats
Expertise Molecular and anatomical
Contact details jparnell@tcd.ie
vonsterm@tcd.ie
sarah.eftonga@gmail.com
kingu@tcd.ie
Links TCD



Last update on: May 13, 2009
Title Improving the uniformity and quality of broadleaf planting stock
Researcher UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science,University College, Dublin and Coille Teo, Ballintemple Nursery, Co. Carlow.
Institution UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science
Research Level M.Sc. and PhD
Summary The aim of the research is to improve seed germination, plant growth and planting stock quality in common alder (Alnus glutinosa Gaertn.), downy birch (Betula pendula Roth and Betula pubescens Ehrh.), ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) spindle tree (Euonymus europaeus L.), and rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L.) in Irish nurseries. The effects of various seed (e.g. moist chilling, priming) and storage treatments on seed germination are being investigated in both laboratory and nursery experiments. The impact of sowing date, seedbed covers and fertiliser amendments on seedling growth and quality are being evaluated in nursery trials.
Funding Agency COFORD (Council for Forest Research and Development)
Duration 40148
Relevant Vice Counties Ireland
Keywords Seed, germination, chilling, storage, fertiliser
Taxa covered: Alnus, Betula, Fraxinus, Quercus robur, Euonymus and Sorbus
Habitats
Expertise Tree physiological techniques, statistics, technology transfer, written and oral communication skills.
Contact details Dr Conor O'Reilly
UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science
Agri & Food Science Centre
University College Dublin
Belfield, Dublin 4 IRELAND
Conor.oreilly@ucd.ie
Phone: +353 1 716 7191
Fax: +353 1 716 1104
Mobile: +353 86 105 5484
Links /www.coford.ie/iopen24/qualibroad-t-196_421_429_246.html



Last update on: April 27, 2009
Title Sectoral impacts on pollinators and pollination services
Researcher Dara Stanley, Jane Stout. Trinity College. This project is part of the multi-institution SIMBIOSYS (Sectoral impacts on biodiversity) project which is focusing on the sectors of energy crops, road building and landscaping and aquaculture in Ireland, and their affects on associated ecosystem services - www.simbiosys.ie .
Institution Trinity College
Research Level PhD
Summary Pollination is the main mode of gene transfer both within and between plant populations and is a vital ecosystem service required by approximately 90% of the angiosperms. However, pollinators and the services they provide are increasingly threatened by many factors including land use change and agricultural intensification. This project is focusing on two major sectoral landuse changes at the landscape level in Ireland, the growth of the bioenergy crops Oilseed rape and Miscanthus and the building of roads and their associated landscape treatments. We are investigating how these land use changes contribute to changes in pollinator diversity and abundance, population structure and loss or enhancement of pollination services in agroecosystems. These impacts will be examined from genetic to landscape scales, using many pollinator species and a number of model plant species.
Funding Agency EPA
Duration 2012
Relevant Vice Counties SE Ireland
Keywords Pollinators, pollination services, energy crops, mass flowering crops
Taxa covered: Brassicaceae, Poaceae, Raphanus raphanistrum, Lotus corniculatus, Brassica napus, Hymenoptera, Diptera,
Habitats Hedgerows, agroecosystems
Expertise Hedgerows, agroecosystems
Contact details stanleyd@tcd.ie
Ph: 8962208
Links www.simbiosys.ie



Last update on: March 31, 2009
Title Fine-spatial Paleoecological Investigations Towards Reconstructing Late Holocene Environmental Change, Landscape Evolution, and Farming Activity in Barrees, Beara Peninsula, Southwestern Ireland
Researcher Anette Overland, Michael O’Connell
Institution National University of Ireland - Galway
Research Level Ph.D.
Summary Long-term environmental change and human impact have been reconstructed at fine spatial and temporal resolutions in the Beara peninsula, County Cork. Detailed pollen and macrofossil analyses, and radiocarbon dating have been carried out on several short peat monoliths, and on a peat core and a lake core from small basins. Landscape evolution, vegetation dynamics, and farming activity from the end of the Neolithic (c. 2500 B.C.) to the present day have been reconstructed. Main woodland clearances took place in the later Bronze Age (beginning c. 1400 B.C. and continuing into the Iron Age, i.e., to c. 400 B.C.). Radiocarbon dating and pollen evidence show that the linear stone-wall system, now partly obscured by shallow peat, was laid out towards the end of the Iron Age (c. A.D. 400) in the context of a largely open landscape. While the initial foci of bog growth appear to relate to the late Neolithic/beginning of the Bronze Age, widespread development of blanket bog was essentially a phenomenon of the late 1st/early 2nd millennium A.D. It was probably favoured by wetter and cooler conditions during the Little Ice Age. Detailed records are presented for the filmy ferns, Hymenophyllum tunbrigense, H. wilsonii, and Trichomanes speciosum, and also Myrica and Ulex.
Funding Agency Fellowship from NUI, Galway
EU project PAN (European Thematic Network on Cultural Landscapes and their Ecosystems; 5th FP, contract no. EVK2-CT-2002-20011 PAN).
Heritage Council (2005 Archaeology Grant Scheme)
the HEA PRTLI2-funded programme Landscape and Society in Early IrelanD
The Millennium Fund, NUI, Galway.
Duration 2008
Relevant Vice Counties Cork
Keywords Pollen, Radiocarbon, Vegetation dynamics, Neolithic, Plaeoenvironment
Taxa covered: Hymenophyllum tunbrigense, Hymenophyllum wilsonii, Trichomanes speciosum, Myrica gale, Ulex europaeus
Habitats Holocene Environmental Change
Expertise Palaeoenvironment
Contact details Palaeoenvironmental Research Unit
Department of Botany
National University of Ireland
Galway
anette.overland@nuigalway.ie
Links Journal of the North Atlantic (2008) 1: 37-73.



Last update on: March 23, 2009
Title Compiling an annotated bibliography to the Irish vascular plant flora
Researcher Darach Lupton, Cristina Armstrong, Matthew Jebb
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary Publications on the Irish flora in regard to vascular plants of a taxonomic, ecological, genetic or conservation nature are being compiled. Once complete this will be part of a on-line suite of databases on the Irish flora.
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Bibliography
Taxa covered: All taxa
Habitats all
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:darach.lupton at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040327
Links



Last update on: March 23, 2009
Title Recovery of the Irish Fleabane – Inula salicina
Researcher Darach Lupton, Noeleen Smyth, Matthew Jebb, Peter Wyse Jacson, Colin Kelleher
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary To re-establish a self-sustaining population of the Irish Fleabane on the shores of Lough Derg. Propagation of material at NBG; Better understanding of historic ecology; Long-term storage of tissue-cultured material. A number of cultivation experiments have been set up at the Gardens, using different soil mediums and water immersion periods.
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties Tipperary
Keywords Conservation, Cultivation, ex situ
Taxa covered: Inula salicina
Habitats Grassland
Expertise Restoration management; Horticulture
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email: matthew.jebb at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040329
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/conserve/inula.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title On-line resources for the study of the Irish Flora
Researcher Matthew Jebb
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary To assemble a comprehensive set of important literature and archive material available at the National Botanic Gardens, and to provide this as an on-line resource, Including:
Synonym look up tables for Bryophytes and Vascular plants in Ireland
Census lists of the Irish Flora
Flora of County Cavan
Flora of County Donegal
Flora of County Waterford
Publications By D.A.Webb, Robert Lloyd Praeger and others.
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration on-going
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Floristics, Archives, Species lists, Taxonomic
Taxa covered: All taxa
Habitats
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email: matthew.jebb at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040329
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/census/resource.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title The vascular flora of Lambay
Researcher Matthew Jebb
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary The flora of Lambay has been reinvestigated. A total of 308 vascular plant taxa are recorded as naturalised on the island. Of the 950 taxa recorded for county Dublin, an historical total of 391 taxa have been reported from the island, of which four are probable errors, and 78 were not seen during the present survey. Fifty-four taxa have been recorded for the first time, of which 33 have probably arisen as weeds of agriculture or horticulture. Comparisons between the flora and vegetation today and the two previous surveys published in 1883 and 1907 are being made.
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration 2009
Relevant Vice Counties Dublin
Keywords Floristics, Lambay, Praeger
Taxa covered:
Habitats
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email: matthew.jebb at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040329
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/lambay.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title Kilmacurragh Arboretum Native Meadow Restoration Trials
Researcher Darach Lupton (National Botanic Gardens)
Seamus O'Brien, Myles Reid, Clare Mullarney and Philip Quested (Kilmacurragh Arboretum)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary A long term (>5 years) monitoring initiative set up in 2008 at the Kilmacurragh Arboretum to assess the optimal management regime for the restoration of natural meadows. The project will provide data on species composition and their potential changes over time in response to varying mowing treatments. Research into species colonisation, species turnover rates and soil seed bank characteristics will be carried out annually. Data gathered and analysed from the research will contribute to the compilation of a management plan for the restoration of Irish meadows.
Funding Agency National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Duration 2013
Relevant Vice Counties Wicklow
Keywords Restoration, Meadow, Seed banks
Taxa covered:
Habitats Grassland
Expertise Restoration management
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:darach.lupton at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040327
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/kilmacmeadow.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title Floating River Vegetation – A Review of the Habitat Description and its Distribution in Ireland
Researcher Colin Kelleher (National Botanic Gardens)
Deirdre Lynn (National Parks and Wildlife Service)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary Floating River Vegetation in Ireland (Habitat 3260 Water courses of plain to montane levels with the Ranunculion fluitantis and Callitricho-Batrachion vegetation) will be assessed, and the current status of the habitat reviewed. Little is known of the diversity of the plant communities of the habitat or of its spatial distribution within Ireland. This project aims to provide a more thorough definition of the habitat in an Irish context and to establish baseline data for a number of sites to allow for future habitat monitoring. The project will undertake a preliminary investigation of the genetic diversity of plants within and between catchments. To date, nothing is known about the genetic diversity of these plants in Irish waterways.
Funding Agency National Parks and Wildlife Service
Duration 2010
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Habitat Monitoring, DNA
Taxa covered: Callitriche, Ranunculus, Potamogeton
Habitats Water courses
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:colin.kelleher at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040326
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/floatingveg.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title Conservation and monitoring of rare and threatened bryophyte species in Ireland
Researcher Christina Campbell (PhD. research student)
Dr. Noeleen Smyth (Supervisor and project manager, National Botanic Gardens)
Dr. Daniel Kelly (Trinity College Dublin)
Dr. Gerry Douglas (Teagasc Kinsealy Research Station)
Dr. David Holyoak (Consultant)
Mr. Donal Synnott (Consultant)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Ph.D.
Summary Set up suitable permanent monitoring for selected bryophyte populations in Ireland to ensure that both the habitat and environment in the remaining Irish sites is recorded and to maintain there suitability into the future for the continued existence of dune slack, machair, fen and metal rich grassland species Ireland. To investigate the developmental stages of some of the more elusive species and to determine reasons for there continued existence in small or single populations. Germination trials and experiments will be carried out at Kinsealy research station in conjunction with Dr. Gerry Douglas. To make a full genetic appraisal of the Irish population of Petalophyllum ralfsii, Bryum uliginosum, Paludella squarrosa, Leiocolea rutheana var. rutheana, Catascopium nigritum, Ditrichum cornubicum.
Funding Agency National Parks and Wildlife Service
Duration 2011
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Conservation, Monitoring, In vitro, DNA
Taxa covered: Petalophyllum ralfsii, Bryum uliginosum, Paludella squarrosa, Leiocolea rutheana var. rutheana, Catascopium nigritum, Ditrichum cornubicum
Habitats various
Expertise In vitro culture of bryophytes
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:noeleen.smyth at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040327
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/bryophyte.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title Eradication of Gunnera tinctoria on Clare Island, Co Mayo
Researcher Cristina Armstrong (National Botanic Gardens)
Deirdre Cunningham (Mayo County Council)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary This project is focusing on the control of G. tinctoria on Clare Island. After 3 years of field trials using the herbicide Glyphosate on Achill Island, results showed success in inhibiting the growth of mature G. tinctoria plants and the death of smaller plants. Due to the size of Clare Island, the size of the population of G. tinctoria on the island, and being an off-shore island, where re-infestations from the mainland could be prevented it was chosen as a candidate for eradication. The distribution of G. tinctoria was mapped on Clare Island, to know the exact location of each plant to be treated.
Funding Agency Biodiversity Fund, Heritage Council
Duration 2010
Relevant Vice Counties Mayo
Keywords Invasive Aliens, Eradication, Restoration
Taxa covered: Gunnera tinctoria
Habitats
Expertise Control of alien invasives
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:cristina.armstrong at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040325
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/claregunnera.htm

Cristina Armstrong's Gunnera Web Pages



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title Investigating Rare Willows in Ireland – Remnants of an Arctic Past
Researcher Colin Kelleher
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary This project is focusing on two rare Salix species found in arctic-alpine habitats in Ireland; Salix herbacea and Salix phylicifolia. The project is assessing the conservation status of the willows based on ecology, population demographics and genetic diversity. Cuttings have been taken for each species for propagation in the National Botanic Gardens in order to maintain ex-situ populations of a range of genotypes and to use in native plant educational displays. Population structure is being investigated using microsatellite markers (right). Estimates of clone size and geographical spread of genotypes are being assessed to aid effective conservation of the species.
Funding Agency Heritage Council Ireland.
Duration 2010
Relevant Vice Counties Sligo, Waterford, Kerry
Keywords Arctic-alpines, DNA, microsatellites
Taxa covered: Salix herbacea; Salix phylicifolia
Habitats montane
Expertise Microsatellite markers
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:colin.kelleher at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040326
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/arcticwillows.htm



Last update on: March 20, 2009
Title Conservation and monitoring of Killarney fern (Trichomanes speciosum) in Ireland
Researcher Ms. Emer Ni Dhuill (PhD. research student)
Dr. Noeleen Smyth (Supervisor and project manager)
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Ph.D.
Summary Set up suitable permanent monitoring for Killarney Fern populations in Ireland to ensure that both the habitat and environment in the remaining Irish sites is recorded and to maintain there suitability into the future for the continued existence of killarney fern in Ireland. To investigate the developmental stages of Killarney Fern and to elucidate reasons for there continued existence in mostly small-scattered populations. Germination trials of fertile populations will be carried at Kinsealy research station in conjunction with Dr. Gerry Douglas. To make a full genetic appraisal of the Irish population of Killarney Fern to help inform conservation management of this species in Ireland.
Funding Agency National Parks and Wildlife Service
Duration 2011
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords Conservation, Monitoring, In vitro, DNA
Taxa covered: Trichomanes speciosum
Habitats
Expertise In vitro culture of ferns
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:noeleen.smyth at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040327
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/trichomanes.htm



Last update on: March 19, 2009
Title Genetic diversity of old Irish Apple cultivars
Researcher Tommy Gallagher
Institution UCD
Research Level MSc
Summary A molecular analysis of the old Irish apple varieties maintained in the Rosemount research Station in UCD and in the Irish Seedsavers orchard in Scariff Co. Clare.
Funding Agency DAFF genetic resources
Duration April 1, 2009
Relevant Vice Counties
Keywords
Taxa covered:
Habitats
Expertise Microsatellite analysis
Contact details 01-7162342
Links



Last update on: March 19, 2009
Title Assessing the wildlife value of existing Rural Environment Protection Schemes (REPS), and reviewing available research to identify the rationale for agri-environmental measures.
Researcher Caitríona Carlin (NUI Galway)
John Finn (Teagasc)
Daire Ó hUallacháin (Teagasc), Mike Gormally (NUI Galway)
Institution Applied Ecology Unit, Centre for Environmental Science, NUI Galway
John Finn, Teagasc
Research Level Institutional research
Summary Relatively little research exists to specifically validate the environmental effectiveness of wildlife measures in agri-environment schemes. To this end we will collate the extensive ecologiclal research that already exists on habitat creation and wildlife management. This will be made available as clear, simple and sensible advice, which is essential if agri-environment measures are to be evidence based and effective.
Based on the judgements of agri-environmental experts from a range of sectors, we aim to identify examples of best practice in the conservation of farmland wildlife, which can also support the REPS
Funding Agency Teagasc
Duration 2009
Relevant Vice Counties All Ireland
Keywords REPS, Habitat Restoration, Wildlife Management, Farmland Wildlife, Best Practice.
Taxa covered:
Habitats Farmland
Expertise
Contact details Caitríona Carlin
Applied Ecology Unit
Centre for Environmental Science
National University of Ireland, Galway.
Links



Last update on: March 19, 2009
Title The Conservation Status of Simethis planifolia (Kerry Lily) in Ireland
Researcher Darach Lupton
Institution National Botanic Gardens of Ireland, Glasnevin.
Research Level Institutional research
Summary The project will provide a conservation assessment for the Kerry Lily in Ireland by undertaking the following research: an associated vegetation survey, population census, an examination of seed production and population genetic diversity analyses. Plants will be grown at the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin and will be used to conduct future research. The living collection at NBG Glasnevin will be used to promote public awareness of issues relating to the conservation of rare Irish plants.
Funding Agency Heritage Council Ireland.
Duration 2009
Relevant Vice Counties Co. Kerry
Keywords Census, Vegetation, Genetic, Population, DNA.
Taxa covered: Simethis planifolia
Habitats Grassland
Expertise
Contact details National Botanic Gardens of Ireland,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 9
Email:darach.lupton at opw.ie
Ph: 01 8040327
Links www.botanicgardens.ie/herb/research/simethis.htm